Monday, September 29, 2014

Slow Reading

Elise mentioned this article on Slow Reading last Friday. It's about groups of people who meet weekly to read silently together in the same room for an hour, with cell phones off, and no interruptions. (It also reported some surprising stats - only 76% of Americans read at least one book in 2013.)

I like the premise of this group's meeting - carving time out of everyday living for reading. Plus there would be a ton of people there to get book recommendations from.

But I'm used to reading at home. Where basically only my cats and a full refrigerator distract me from my book. But reading in a public cafe? Or even in a large room with other people reading? I think I'd spend a lot of time thinking about how much I like that woman's sweater, and if I know that guy from somewhere or if he just has a familiar-looking face. 
I'm also not the best reading companion. I read the whole of Me Before You yesterday and the only reason I didn't stop once to babble about it was that Mr. G slept in quite late. Under normal circumstances though, I love to chat when I read - to repeat striking dialogue, express my frustration at characters' behavior, ask questions, and guess at the ending (particularly if it's a mystery). Enjoyable for me, but not for others who prefer silent reading. 

Would you join a reading club?

11 comments:

  1. It's an interesting idea - the commitment of going to a meeting would help me stick to a reading schedule. But I'd be just like you - looking at people's jewellery and hair, daydreaming about this or that...!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the commitment aspect too :)

      Delete
  2. That's something we were made to do in school - they called it the DEAR program - Drop Everything and Read. I take it you liked the Moyes book, then!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not a fan of DEAR programs, as a universal program across a school. There is no evidence that it improves literacy nor enjoyment. But I do support targeted reading programs. I always started my Junior English classes with silent sustained reading. Every lesson. I would ensure they were actually reading the same book, and if not why they swapped. IT meant they were actually reading not just engaging in sustained silent staring. And I could recommend books. Most students ended up loving the time because I could find a book for them. And we would talk about our books - which meant students shared their reading. And I could gauge the mood - when it was right to stop reading sooner and when we all needed more time.

      Together with other reading strategies, I could raise all those data some parents like - reading age, reading scores etc. but I just liked to see students enjoy reading, and knowing they would keep reading beyond set texts, ie read for pleasure,

      Delete
    2. Dar - ha, I remember sustained silent reading (SSR) in 3rd grade. Yes, thoroughly enjoyed Me Before You :)

      Lucinda - I adored teachers who loved to read and could recommend books for me!

      Delete
  3. I like talking as much as I like reading. If I'm with People Who Read, I'd want to talk with them. And I'd annoy everyone else by asking questions and telling stories. So I know I'd be kicked out of the group. But I dolike the idea of women sitting around reading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to know I'm not the only one! I'd definitely want to talk to People Who Read :)

      Delete
  4. I miss the days of reading an entire book uninterrupted! The silent book club is an interesting concept though I completely agree, I would be distracted. I think I probably would join a book club for the accountability factor. I've seen lots of online book clubs but haven't been able to find an in person one locally. The only thing I'm wary of is finding a good match with others who share the same taste in books. I'm one to give up if I don't like something in the first 20 pages (I'll skim forward a bit too, just to make sure). I wouldn't want to feel like having to stick a book out that I wasn't enjoying just to be able to discuss it..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The accountability aspect is awesome. :) I'm hesitant to join a book club for similar reasons. I dislike being forced or required to read a book - plus I also like being able to give up on books that don't hold my interest.

      Delete
  5. it is sad to hear that so many people don't read.. i am on a mission to make my son a lover of books.. my husband has started to read again because of me.. he can only finish a book or two a year but hey better than no books right?
    I don't think i could read like that.. i have little kids.. so i read while nursing, while putting them to sleep and so on.. I like to read in bed, in my pj's.. not on a stiff chair.
    but hey.. whatever gets more people to read.. I am all for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true! My hubby rarely reads, but he listens to me read aloud or audiobooks on CD during his commute. Works for me! :)

      Delete

I love comments - please leave one (or twelve)!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...