Saturday, January 18, 2014

Do you have an accent?

Of course, I don't think I have an accent - everyone else does, right? ;)
one of my answers

Have you seen this dialect quiz? It's meant for the US, so I don't know how accurate the results would be for someone overseas, but the questions are at least interesting and several made me think. I take words for granted sometimes (and assume people know what I'm talking about when I say roly poly and spigot) so this was a nice reminder of the many little language differences. One word I definitely say differently from others is route - most people around here pronounce it root (like the underground part of a tree), but I say rowt (like this video).

Some parts of my accent or dialect are muddled because I've read books from other regions and time periods. But overall, the quiz results were correct for my husband and I (only a few questions placed us outside of where we're from). I'd love to hear how you fare!

12 comments:

  1. I definitely have an accent. I can hear other Aussies a mile off. And it is even more obvious when you hear your home accent amidst other people. I am currently in New Zealand. How I hear them pronounce the word "six" and the phrase "fish and chips" never ceases to make me laugh. (Sex and fush and chups. We've been in room sex twice on our trip!)

    The NY Times quiz doesn't work for me - too many of my answers don't come up but it was fun to do. I was very similar to Milwaukee. And I say root for route, unless I have kids around who I will know mock me because root is a slang term for sex, then I say rawte.

    As to dialect and different words, NZ and Australian English have some very different words for everyday objects, and NZ uses a lot of more English terms such as stream where Aussies would say creek.

    I find how English has changed so interesting!

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    1. Oh, very true. I remember thinking how different I sounded when we visited Texas a few years back. I'd laugh at six being sex as well!

      I read a book set in UK, and it included a little glossary at the back since it had so many British terms - I was so grateful. And many people moved to the US from the UK, so you wouldn't think the languages would be that different so quick. I agree, it's so interesting :)

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  2. I definitely have an accent too, being Aussie. There were so many words in that NY Times quiz that I had never even heard of, which was really interesting (I have no idea what a roly poly or spigot is!) Mostly, my pronunciation came up without a match, but in the end, the closest pick was a Jersey City / Yonkers accent! Great fun doing the quiz!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it! A roly poly is this bug and a spigot is another name for faucet or tap. I used it at school as a kid and I remember people looking at me confused.

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  3. Aussie too - but I did the quiz, after Sherry and John also did it on Young House Love. I could either be from Yonkers, NYC or Jersey city (with some warmth around Miami). There's things/words in the quiz I've *never* heard of. I think Australians get a lot of English influence in works we use.

    The sprigot one didn't come up for me, but I use faucet sometimes and people look at me weirdly - it's definitely a tap here!! I also started saying 'swimmers' as a more generic term rather than the state of Queensland's term: togs, and the New South Wales state term: cossies (which I'd not heard except from cousins from down here). I also think it's weird I call them sandshoes when they are for running, but when I hear American firends call them tennis shoes, I think of Dunlop Volleys (do you know them?)

    It's also hilarious when I catch up with friends from other countries, you so quickly forget their accents!

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    1. Oh, you're right - I forgot John & Sherry had mentioned it. Oops! I saw it again this week on another blog and remembered I'd meant to blog about it.

      Swimmers, togs, and cossies are all new words to me. :) We say bathing suit, swimsuit, bikini around here (and men wear swim trunks).

      I call them sneakers - tennis shoes, running shoes, etc. would be something I use for just that activity. I've never heard of Dunlop Volleys til now, but they look like Chucks (Converse) or Keds here. I work with a few people from other parts of the country, and you're right - I hear their accents when we first start chatting, and then I don't even notice it after a few minutes. :)

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  4. The three cities it gave me were all in Michigan, so I'd say it was pretty accurate :) Thanks for sharing, this was fun!

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  5. oddly mine centres on close to Seattle, no where I've been or been close to. the further east and south you go, the more steadily it is less like my voice. it doesn't account for Canadian accents.

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    1. It's too bad Canada isn't included. I'd be interested in that quiz :)

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  6. The quiz was a bit wonky for me, but it was interesting to take. My parents are from TX and I grew up in Alberta, then moved all around before settling in PA. It was funny that if you called a long sandwich a "hoagie" you get assigned to Philly no matter what else you say!

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    1. That's a lot of influences. haha, I guess they assume only someone from Philly would call it a hoagie!

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